Paul McCartney Suing Sony For IP Rights

Linkilaw Business News

Even if it means taking the long and winding road through the legal system, rock legend Sir Paul McCartney is bound and determined to get the rights back to the Beatles’ biggest hits.

The rights were sold to Sony/ATV in 2016 for $750 million, but McCartney is trying to invoke a US copyright law that states that any work produced before 1978 would return to the original artist 56 years after its creation.

McCartney and former bandmate John Lennon began copywriting songs together in 1962, which means 2018 will be 56 years since then. For some time Michael Jackson owned the rights to many of the Beatles’ songs, but made no mention of what should be done with them in his will after his 2009 passing.

It’s difficult to say what effect the rulings of an US court will have on IP law in the UK. Even the recent United Patent Court decision on IP isn’t iron clad for who is in the right in the UK. And even the Queen has weighed in on the changing face of IP in the UK, asking for broad sweeping reform last May. 

McCartney filed the lawsuit in New York City. He is hoping for a better outcome than the one fellow British rockers Duran Duran received when they tried to sue Sony in December to get their rights back. The court ruled that an American termination law took a backseat to British law and the rights stayed in Sony’s hands.

Paul McCartney suing Sony for IP rights

Clearly this isn’t about the money for McCartney, who purportedly has a net worth of $1.2 billion, but about the ownership of music that he wrote near the beginning of his career that he feels entitled to owning in his golden years.

Will the power of Paul be enough to help him get back the titles the intellectual property (IP) he feels are his?

Will Paul McCartney Successfully Defend His IP Rights?

It’s anyone’s guess what will happen with this situation and only time will tell. What this does show is the need to take the issue of IP rights seriously and we’re proud to say that we can help you do that.

Get the legal advice you need to make sure that your IP rights are protected with a free Startup Legal Session. Click the image below to get started.

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