business standing out

Is Your Business Standing Out From The Crowd?

Linkilaw Marketing & Social Media, Startup Advice & Tips

In case you haven’t given it much thought lately, it’s as good a time as any to remind you that your customers are the side your bread is buttered on. Your outcome (and income) depends on just how capable you are of providing them with something they either need or desire – perhaps both.

Your being in love with what you sell isn’t really a requirement. However, integrity of purpose and interest in pleasing the consumers who ‘consume’ what you have to sell should always be prominent in your current and future goals. And, this outlook will also serve to keep you head and shoulders above the rest for your business standing out .

Sometimes you can get so caught up in balancing your books, ordering supplies (and securing your valuables as you lock up for the night) that you lose sight of what brought you there in the first place. Unfortunately, most failures in business have to do with misplacing your humility, or losing touch with your instincts.

The Significance of Value

Staying ahead of the curve has always been important in business, but never more than in our current global economy. Many people have less to spend, and most everyone is more particular about what they do purchase. What used to be taken at face value must now have added benefit, or greater merit than ever before for your business standing out .

In order to have a successful business model, not only must you work to retain the loyalty of your regular customers, but you also have to keep finding new ways to bring in new prospects. It’s a bit like riding in tandem, and switching up the lead horse at every intersection. Exhausting? Yes. But it’s the price you pay for the privilege of running your own company.

Get to Know Your Target Audience

Analytics aren’t everything. Numbers may give you a composite of the neighborhood, with statistics about gender and age range. But this data doesn’t necessarily reveal what motivates these people. Why would someone buy your product or use your service? Ask your friends and family, business associates, suppliers. Talk to people, about people for your business standing out.

You really need to find out what customers want, and desire. Which of these needs are being met, and which ones aren’t available? Try to fill a gap between demand and supply. Then test your ideas against trends, and put aside those concepts which are already well-filled by competitors.

How is Your Personal Brand Different?

A very popular concept – which sparked an entirely new marketing revolution in the 1940s – is called a unique selling proposition (USP). Essentially, the USP is not just the reason why you think your product or service is different from others, it’s why it is better than those of your competitor’s.

How do you let your customers know what is special about you? It all comes down to the way you promote your brand – makes sense, right?

Your product may actually be quite similar to others. If so, then give some thought to bringing other aspects to the forefront. Maybe you could provide free shipping or gift wrapping? Think about rewarding repeat customers with special ‘return the love’ discounts, and the like for your business standing out.

If your company has developed any unique selling propositions or other proprietary assets, be sure you have expert legal advice for business trademarks in place. These can protect your marketing position under the full extent of the law; as will copyrights and patents.

Outshining Your Competition

Your store might be cleaner, your parking more accessible, and the employees friendlier. All of this matters, in the scheme of things. Customers will go out of their way, and even pay a little more for a finer experience.

Think of your staff as brand ambassadors. When they are treated well, their respect for your company is going to be evident; conveying strong credibility for your brand. If anything can hurt a business more than a lack of customer traffic, it is disgruntled employees. If they are disrespected or unhappy, your brand will be affected adversely.

Your advertising should make a proposition to your buyers; “if you purchase this service or item, this is how you will benefit.” What you are selling should be unique, and not infringe on any other company’s registered identities.




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